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Instructional Presentation on Pet Photography – Halton Hills Camera Club – October 4th

Trina was asked to speak at Halton Hills Camera Club in Georgetown on on October 4th at 7:00pm. She will talk about pet photography, Focus on Nature, and our Photo Cuba Workshop. The speech is going to be 90 minutes, with the first half focused solely on pet photography.

Trina will go into detail about tips for photographing animals, covering topics such as lighting techniques, equipment that she uses, strategies to get the best shots, and more.

A slideshow will accompany the presentation and will provide examples of what you can be doing to improve your photos. Afterwards there will be a question and answer period for more specific advice.

For the second half of the presentation, Trina will discuss Focus on Nature, a charity based in Guelph that inspires young people to explore and connect with nature through photography. They conduct workshops in schools and day camps in the summer and during March Break.

As well, she will talk about Photo Cuba Workshop, a photography workshop that takes you to Santiaga de Cuba to connect to the locals through the art of photography.

Hope to see some of you at the presentation!

Pet Photography Tips  – PART 1

Pet Photography in Guelph, Ontario. Pet photography is getting even more popular now that everyone has cameras on their phones. If you love your pet it’s likely that you’ve got tons of pictures of them on your phone. Capturing your pet’s quirky or majestic personality on camera can give you special memories of them to cherish forever.  The common problems when taking photos of your pet are getting their personality to show through and getting clear, well-lit shots of them.

Here are some examples of pet photography that you can reference for the next time you photograph your pet.   Read on to enjoy some pet photography tips and tricks that will help you get the perfect shot.


Pet Photography Tips

  • Help your pet feel relaxed

Pet photography is difficult when your pet isn’t feeling relaxed.  Make sure that you’re feeling relaxed yourself, because animals pick up on energy and can sense when you are feeling anxious or stressed out.  Gently stroke your cat or dog to help them feel calmer if they are moving around a lot and you want to take a still picture.  You can also try taking photos after tiring them out with toys so that they aren’t as hyper.

  • Photograph your pet in good lighting

Getting good lighting is key to capturing the details of your furry friend’s face.  Natural light is the simplest method, but if you are in a room with little natural light try using cool white light bulbs as they are closest to natural light.

  • Keep your pet feeling happy while shooting

The easiest way to do this is usually by giving them treats when they sit still, so they learn over time that being your pet photography model pays off. To get a great shot of your cat, try dangling some string around and watch them become very focused.  For your dog, try holding a treat next to the camera or telling it what a ‘good dog’ it is to get them feeling happy.

  • Focus on the eyes

The eyes are the most expressive part of animals, so make sure to get some closeups.  Capturing them in action while they are playing with their toy or after they’ve made a mess and are feeling guilty can bring out some great expressions in a dog’s face (although cats are better at hiding their feelings).

  • Get on their level

To really get connected to how your pet feels, get down on the floor or in the grass when they are playing. Pet photography is all about bringing out your pet’s personality and being able to see them like another animal would see them.  If your pet sees you at the same height as them, they’ll likely feel more relaxed and connected to you, allowing you to capture them at their best.

Follow these tips to get better photos of your pet. If you live near Guelph, Ontario and want to get some professional photos of your pet, contact Trina Koster.